Category Archives: children

Family Life Cycle in the Church

From the Along the Journey blog of the Center for Lifelong Learning: “Family Life Cycle Programming in the Church.” Please like & share:

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Church curriculum resources

In honor of Theological Libraries Month & American Archives Month the library staff at Columbia Theological Seminary sent this helpful list of curricular resources for congregations. These resources are available at the library’s curriculum lab (located in the children’s library). … Continue reading

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A new resource for children’s missions education

I’m pleased to announce the release of a new resource for children’s missions education: Ready! Set! Go! Children on Mission Throughout the Church Year. The book was written by the students in my Teaching Children course, co-taught by Barbara Massey, … Continue reading

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The brain and learning, 5

Today’s brain and learning concept: the brain perceives and creates parts and wholes. The brain has two separate but simultaneous tendencies for organizing information. One is to reduce information to parts. The other is to perceive and work with information … Continue reading

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The brain and learning, 4

Today’s brain and learning concept: emotions are critical to learning. Generally, educational enterprises tend to separating emotion from thinking. Though the importance of emotions to learning has been acknowledged the connection between emotion and cognition remains, by and large, unaddressed. … Continue reading

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Going with what you know

I sometimes share with my students the phenomenon of what I’ve come to call “The Jay Leno Jaywalking Effect.” If you’ve ever watched Jay Leno’s man-on-the-street interview segment called “Jaywalking” you’ve seen the phenomenon. Leno will ask a passerby a … Continue reading

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Talking to children about the economy

During a conversation among parents about their children—now adolescents and young adults the issue of children and money came up. There were the usual rants about children not appreciating the value of money, anxieties about paying for college expenses, the … Continue reading

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“I don’t want to do that.”

I was intrigued by overhearing a common phrase last week. Overheard several times was the phrase, “I don’t want to do that.” It’s a common enough phrase (anyone who has ever had a three or four year old around the … Continue reading

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Online literacy

I used to find it difficult to correct student papers on the computer screen, preferring to print out dozens of pages to correct then with red pen in hand. Over the years my predilection has switched: I’ve come to prefer … Continue reading

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Brain Week: The secret life of the brain

Today’s “Brain Week” feature is a link to the website of the PBS series, “The Secret Life of the Brain.” The series originally aired in 2002. The website includes a summary of the five episodes which take a developmental view: … Continue reading

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